Archives for October, 2010

What we didn't say about China and wind energy

Posted: Oct. 28, 2010 | Tags: American Wind Energy Association, Investigative Reporting Workshop, Russ Choma, stimulus, wind energy

I guess you could say it's a small sign that the Investigative Reporting Workshop has arrived: Our stories about wind energy and the stimulus have become grist for the mill in scores of political campaigns around the nation in recent weeks.

These ads are mostly coming from Republican candidates for the House and the central charge in many of them is that stimulus money for wind energy has been going to China. Just to be clear, as Politifact and others have found, we never said that.

Russ Choma's carefully reported stories document that more than half the $4 ...

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'Five local stories to do now on the green stimulus'

Posted: Oct. 27, 2010 | Tags: Reynolds Business Center, Russ Choma, stimulus, wind energy

In case you weren't able to catch the live stream from today's Reynolds Center-sponsored event, 'What's Next For the Economy in Your Town,"  below you will find video from our reporter Russ Choma's presentation on 'Five Local Stories To Do Now On The Green Stimulus."

His PowerPoint presentation is here.

Wednesday's event, held at American University, was designed to help journalists determine which economic stories matter for their local audience. 

In addition to Choma, the workshop featured presentations by Gus Faucher, director for macroeconomics for Moody’s Economy.com, Ezra Klein of The Washington ...

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More on DC broadband – Promised versus delivered speeds

Posted: Oct. 8, 2010 | Tags: broadband, Comcast, Connected, Ookla

A big issue in the broadband debate is whether companies are delivering on their promises when it comes to connection speeds. Ookla, the Seattle-based technology company that I wrote about earlier this week regarding value, looked at this issue as well.

The results in the U.S. were surprisingly good. The survey shows that actual speeds were 93.02 percent of promised speeds in the U.S., ranking the nation in 11th place. That’s based on 258,227 surveys nationwide.

The top five states were Delaware (101.55 percent); Massachusetts (100.06 percent); Maryland (99.68 percent); Rhode Island ...

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District pays a lot per broadband bit

Posted: Oct. 6, 2010 | Tags: broadband, Connected, economy, net neutrality

Washingtonians get less bang for their broadband buck than every state in the nation except Alaska, according to a survey released Tuesday.

District subscribers don’t pay much per month ($43.72, fifth when compared to the 50 states) but when you add connection speeds to the equation, it’s a different story.

The median monthly cost for broadband in the District was $11.93 per megabit per second (Mbs), according to Ookla, the Seattle-based technology company that conducted the survey. That’s nearly double the national median cost of $6.13 Mbps.

Megabits per second is a measure of ...

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Bank failure costs hit $20 billion

Posted: Oct. 5, 2010 | Tags: banks, BankTracker, failed banks, FDIC, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over two more failed banks last Friday, pushing the number for the year to 129 and the estimated cost to more than $20 billion, with three months left in the year.

Last year the FDIC had closed 97 banks through Oct. 2, but because the failed banks were larger, the total estimated cost to the government was more than $27.3 billion.

By the end of 2009, 140 banks had failed at a total estimated cost to the federal insurance fund of more than $37.2 billion. Last year there were eight bank failures ...

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Visionaries sustain journalistic values with trusts

Posted: Oct. 1, 2010 | Tags: Charles Lewis, Investigative News Network, nonprofit organization, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism , University of Oxford

In recent decades, we have seen some of the most respected, powerful media families in America sell their newspapers away to the highest bidders. We’ve watched and winced as the Chandlers sold the Los Angeles Times, the Pulitzer family sold the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the Bingham family sold the Louisville Courier-Journal, the Knight-Ridder families broke up their chain of flagship newspapers, including The Philadelphia Inquirer and The Miami Herald, and the Bancroft family members sold Dow Jones and The Wall Street Journal to Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation.

With each successive generation, the apple fell further from the journalism ...

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Recent Posts

New Trump biography reveals a complex picture

Washington Post staffers talk about "Trump Revealed," the new book by Michael Kranish and Marc Fisher that draws on a team of reporters and fact-checkers who looked into the presidential candidate's life and his worldwide travels, his hotel-rebuilding successes and his investment failures in Atlantic City casinos. The Post also makes hundreds of documents available for readers to see for themselves how they reported the story.

What we're reading: In-depth stories covering a wide range of topics

In this investigation the Food & Environment Reporting Network looks into how oil palm plantations have not only threatened rainforests in Indonesia and Malaysia but also opened doors to poachers. The story is one of several a young reporter has been following in his immersive year into investigative reporting.

Charge of assaulting an officer narrows in DC

Last fall, formal legislation was introduced by the D.C. Council to narrow the definition of what constituted an assault on a police officer. The council committee that crafted the language in the bill cited "Assault on Justice," an investigation by WAMU-FM, the Investigative Reporting Workshop and Reveal of the Center for Investigative Reporting, for prompting the reform.

In March 2016, the bill finally became law. A look at how the change unfolded.


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