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In the future, it is possible this policy will change to permit us to maintain lists of users and communicate with them. When it does, the following principles will apply:

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Latest from iLab

Asian journalists wrestle with new rules

Indonesia, the Philippines and South Korea news organizations face new challenges online as their governments now include internet activity in their regulatory structures. What used to be a niche for independent media has instead become a new battleground for freedom of expression. 

Seven signs Cuban media is moving toward openness

While it’s too soon to tell if a true sea change is in the works, here are seven relatively recent shifts in the Cuban mediasphere. Many of them would have seemed inconceivable just a few years ago and bear watching in the future.

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

Journalism in the Trump era

Not only did the new president call the media “dishonest” the first day after taking office, but Sean Spicer, his press secretary, accused the media of “deliberately false reporting” on the inauguration’s crowd size. What do reporters think is the best way to deal with a hostile administration?

Becoming a journalist

How did some of the pros covering the new administration get their start? Several weighed in during a recent panel on the challenges of covering the new Trump administration.

Recent news

“We’ve never seen anything this bizarre in our lifetimes, where up is down and down is up and everything is in question and nothing is real,” said Charles Lewis, the founder of the Center for Public Integrity and the author of “935 Lies: The Future of Truth and the Decline of America’s Moral Integrity.” 

Summer 2017 interns

We're looking for talented student journalists to join our team in the summer of 2017.  Positions include researchers/reporters, data journalists and video editors. Application deadline is Feb. 15.

Russia's disinformation strategy

Louise Lief, our scholar in residence, writes about Russia's manipulation of news and information, not only in the recent U.S. elections but also in other countries as well. 

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.