Funding our work

Thursday, November 17th, 2016 

Dear friends:

The work we’ve published in 2016 would not have been possible without two significant groups: our interns and our donors.  

Our interns — graduate students from American University and other schools around the country — research and report through our partnerships with The Washington Post, FRONTLINE and other major media. We are proud to count Workshop alums among the staff at the Post, NBC News, Politico, McClatchy, the Huffington Post, the Houston Chronicle, WNYC, Colorado Public Radio and Mother Jones, among many others.

Our funding — independent of the university, which provides office space and tech support —  comes from donors large and small. In 2016, that funding allowed us to examine fatal shootings by police and unwarranted evictions with the Post; ongoing housing problems more than three years after Hurricane Sandy with FRONTLINE; the difficulty victims face in prosecuting childhood sexual abuse as adults with Reveal News. We studied the growth of the many courageous nonprofit newsrooms overseas; analyzed eight years’ worth of banking data to get a clearer picture of the toll the recession took on every state; and relayed how Cuban media may finally be opening up to average citizens.

Thank you for helping to make these investigations a reality.  

Please consider making your donation this year on or by Nov. 29 — which is Giving Tuesday nationwide — to ensure that our stories in 2017 will be as impactful as they have been in the past; this year, a story we wrote led to a change in a law in Washington.

If you haven’t donated before, a contribution of any amount demonstrates your belief in independent journalism. And if you’re a continuing donor, please consider a recurring donation of $5 or $10 a month.

Your donations will allow us to continue this work and to train the next generation of great investigative reporters.

Thank you for your support,

Lynne Perri, Managing Editor

p.s.  All donations to the Investigative Reporting Workshop are tax-deductible.


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Incubating new economic models for journalism.

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Future of DC transparency

The future of transparency in D.C. government is murky, open records advocates say.

Since its creation in 2011, the Office of Open Government has been tasked with keeping more than 90 District agencies in compliance with the Freedom of Information Act. But the board that oversees the office will not reappoint its inaugural director, Traci L. Hughes, making transparency advocates worried about the office’s future.  

The power of reporters, working together

Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis writes about global teamwork in investigative reporting in his chapter for a new book published by the Reuters Institute at the University of Oxford. 

Blogs

Most Recent Posts

Apprehensions at U.S.-Mexico border down from 2017

The number of people apprehended or denied entry into the U.S. dropped from 2017.

Donations to nonprofit newsrooms continue to grow after 'Trump bump'

Despite his persistent claims of fake news and shoddy reporting, President Donald Trump’s contentious relationship with the media has actually provided a much-needed financial boost for many nonprofit,  investigative journalism organizations across the country.

Asbestos, highway safety and child strangulation prevention

Check out our three reprints from FairWarning.

Stories include preventions in child strangulation, Johnson & Johnsons carcinogen worries and highway safety.

 

How Trump is shaping immigration policy

“It is time to reform these outdated immigration rules, and finally bring our immigration system into the 21st century," said President Donald Trump at his first State of the Union. 

What Trump didn’t talk about were the ups and downs of immigration under his administration. The Investigative Reporting Workshop built a timeline of immigration during Trump’s first year, and we’ll continue to update it.

American trust in the media is low, but majority believes it is necessary

More than 80 percent of U.S. adults believe the news media are critical or very important to our democracy, according to a recent survey by Gallup and the Knight Foundation.

Partners

Workshop Partners

We publish online and in print, often teaming up with other news organizations. We're working now on a new program with FRONTLINE producers, to air later in the year, and on the "Years of Living Dangerously," a series on climate change that has begun airing on Showtime. A story last year on the use of solitary confinement in immigration detention centers was co-published with The New York Times. Our updates to our long-running BankTracker project, in which you can view the financial health of every bank and credit union in the country, have been published with msnbc.com, now nbcnews.com, and we co-published stories in our What Went Wrong series on the economy with The Philadelphia Inquirer and New America Media. Our graduate students are working as researchers with Washington Post reporters, and our new senior editor is a member of the Post's investigative team. Learn more on our partners page.

Projects

Investigating Power update

Investigating Power update

Profiles of notable journalists and their stories of key moments in U.S. history in the last 50 years can be found on the Investigating Power site. See Workshop Executive Editor Charles Lewis' latest video interviews as well as historic footage and timelines. You can also read more about the project and why we documented these groundbreaking examples of original, investigative journalism that helped shape or change public perceptions on key issues of our time, from civil rights to Iraq, here.